Romney says campaign didn't connect with minorities - WNCN: News, Weather

Romney says campaign didn't connect with minorities

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Mitt Romney said his heart said he was going to win the presidency, but when early results came in on election night, he knew it was not to be.
    
The GOP nominee told "Fox News Sunday" that he knew his campaign was in trouble when exit polls suggested a close race in Florida. Romney thought he'd win the state solidly.
    
Obama ended up taking Florida and won the election by a wide margin in the electoral vote.
    
Romney said there was "a slow recognition" at that time that President Barack Obama would win - and the race soon was over when Obama carried Ohio.
    
Romney said the loss hit hard and was emotional. Ann Romney says she cried.
    
The former Massachusetts governor acknowledged mistakes in the campaign and flaws in his candidacy.
    
But he joked that he did better in his second run for the White House than he did the first time around - when he lost the 2008 nomination to Arizona Sen. John McCain.
    
He said he won't get a third crack at it.
    
Romney says his campaign didn't do a good job connecting with minority voters, and that Republicans must do a better job in appealing to African-Americans and Hispanics.

He said his campaign underestimated the appeal of Obama's new health care law to low-income voters.

Romney drew 27 percent of the Latino vote and 6 percent of the African-American vote.   
But he knows that because he lost the race, it's hard to tell the GOP to listen now to what he has to say about how to improve the party's message.
    
The Romneys are living in Southern California now and he has kept a low profile since the election. He said "you move on" from the disappointment and that "I don't spend my life looking back."

He was critical, however, of Obama's second term so far. In particular, he said Washington never should have reached the point of sequestration.

"The president is out campaigning to the American people, doing rallies around the country, flying around the country and berating Republicans and blaming and pointing," Romney said, according to Fox. "That causes the Republicans to retrench and to put up a wall and to fight back."

He also addressed his "47 percent" comment, which he called "a very unfortunate statement."

"It's not what I meant. I didn't express myself as I wished I would have," he said, according to Fox. "You know, when you speak in private, uh, you don't spend as much time thinking about how something could be twisted and distorted. And it could come out wrong. … There's no question that hurt and did real damage to my campaign.
    
The interview was taped Thursday and aired Sunday.

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