Post Zimmerman verdict, NC law changes unlikely - WNCN: News, Weather

Post Zimmerman verdict, NC law changes unlikely

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Following the George Zimmerman verdict, changes to North Carolina's self-defense laws are unlikely. 

That's according to one lawmaker.  Democratic State Senator Floyd McKissick says he would like to see restrictions to a North Carolina law that allows the use of deadly force when an intruder enters your workplace or car.  Lawmakers approved changes to the state's "Castle Doctrine" in 2011, expanding protections beyond just a person's home.  McKissick says the votes just are not there to make any changes.

"I think it's important to use this opportunity for reflection and to think about what we might do in North Carolina to avoid a Trayvon Martin type of incident, but at the same time with the mood of North Carolina as it is today, as far as those types of defenses, I'm not sure it will get very far in the General Assembly," McKissick said. "I support the idea of being able to do it in your home, but I think you need to keep it in your home because that's what the idea was based upon."

Last weekend, a Florida jury found George Zimmerman not guilty in the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.  Zimmerman claimed self-defense in the 2012 shooting.  Florida's "Stand Your Ground" law allows the use of deadly force when a person believes their own life is threatened.

More: Zimmerman cleared in shooting of Trayvon Martin

Derick Waller

Derick is a reporter for WNCN covering crime, education, politics and just about everything in between. He has a knack for adapting to any story and consistently delivers information quickly across multiple platforms. More>>

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