"A Closer Look" - retired Marine Adame wants to serve again - WNCN: News, Weather

"A Closer Look" - retired Marine Adame wants to serve in Congress

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Retired Marine Marshall Adame is running to represent District 3 in the U.S. House of Representatives Retired Marine Marshall Adame is running to represent District 3 in the U.S. House of Representatives

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) – As a retired United States Marine, Marshall Adame served his country in times of war and peace. While working as a defense contractor in Saudi Arabia last year, Adame became discouraged with the volatile language he saw and heard back home surrounding the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. That's when he decided to try serving his country in a different way, as a U.S. Congressman.

"I think our politics should be civil," Adame said when asked what sparked his decision to file for office. "I called a few people in Jacksonville (North Carolina, where he has lived for nearly 40 years) and a couple friends in Washington, DC, and said ‘this is hurting me, this hurts to watch what is going on'. I've been pretty successful in my life, and I want to do something, anything. I called my wife and said I am coming home to run for Congress."

Like most first-time politicians, Adame is learning what life is like on the campaign trail. District 3, where he is running as a Democratic candidate, is one of the largest geographical districts in North Carolina, touching all or part of 23 counties. In his brief time of campaigning, Adame says he has run into people who don't know which district they belong to. "I am working very hard to make sure that everybody knows where they vote," Adame said.  "We've adopted a campaign policy that if we are in part of a county, we are going to campaign the whole county because we don't want to miss anybody. The issues are so important right now in North Carolina, we're going the extra mile to reach out to everybody we can."

Adame takes an approach that a member of Congress can be influential in what happens back home. He says Democrats he talks to in eastern North Carolina are concerned with the direction the state is taking under the Republican majority in the General Assembly.  "As a United States Congressman, I can encourage the people of this state to use their authority as citizens to push our state government to do the things that the people of this state want done," he said. "An example is the Moral Mondays. If I were a Congressman right now, I would be using my voice, my pulpit, to support that and to encourage people to keep doing it."

While admitting he is not familiar with the regulations for businesses to move into north Carolina, Adame does have a plan to help in recruiting of new industries.  "It is one of my goals as a congressman to assign somebody on my staff, full-time, the job to find businesses that we can enter into discussions with and introduce to the entities in this state and get them together. That means we are going to have to communicate with our commissioners, our mayors, those people are going to have a lot of input in my office in Washington," he said.

With America's oil production and exports increasing, Adame favors a cautious approach to looking for oil off the Atlantic Coast. "The last thing we need to do right now in this part of our history is to take the risk of putting oil drilling apparatus outside our coast," Adame said.  "We don't need to drill off the coast of North Carolina, as long as I am a United States Congressman, I will do everything in my power to prevent that from happening."

Adame points to winning the Democratic primary May 6th as the first step in becoming the next Congressman from North Carolina. That's when he says he will take aim at the incumbent, Rep. Walter B. Jones, who is serving his tenth term in the House. Adame says working to energize Democrats, Independents and the "disenfranchised Republicans" will be the key to his success.

"We are going to energize them by giving them a lot of information, a lot of facts about what is really going on in Washington, and how much Congressman Jones has really done for the Third District," Adame said.  "How he has actually affected the Third District itself in the 20 years he's been up there. When all of that information comes out, eventually you will realize that it's not much. If we want something different, we have to make a change somewhere. I'm saying ‘let's make the change in the United States Congress".

Click here to visit the candidate's website.

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