How safe are diet pills - WNCN: News, Weather

How safe are diet pills

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Many people struggle to find the right balance to live a heart healthy life.

Kellen Hillard has battled her weight all of her life. Despite that, she refuses to try diet pills.

"I don't trust any part of it," Hillard said. "I don't want to be a part of it just to cause more damage than the weigh I have already."

Doctors say diet pills offering fast weight loss options can be extremely dangerous for the heart.

"They're loaded with caffeine. A lot of them have some type of stimulant involved where they're going to artificially elevate your metabolism," said Dr. Stephanie Martin, a Cardiologist at East Carolina Heart Institute at ECU.

In 2013, the FDA approved two diet pills - Qsymia and Belviq - for the first time in over a decade.

Despite that, Dr. Martin is still skeptical about how safe diet pills are for younger and older people.

"I think it still poses a lot of risks," Dr. Martin said. "Abnormal heart rhythms. The risk of, the demand, placed on the heart causing a heart attack."

Hillard said, regardless of FDA approval, she won't take diet pills. Instead, she will do other things to live a healthier life.

"Even if it's just parking a little further from a store and walking a little bit extra every day. I'm going to stick with that. I'm more comfortable with that.
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