DURHAM: Damaged roads could cost NC drivers - WNCN: News, Weather

Damaged roads could cost NC drivers

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The report said nearly 11 percent of major roads and highways in the state are in poor condition with nearly a third of bridges in the state being structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The report said nearly 11 percent of major roads and highways in the state are in poor condition with nearly a third of bridges in the state being structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
DURHAM, N.C. - Damaged roads in North Carolina could costs drivers in the state as much as $6.5 billion.

Drivers could lose $1,000 on average with some of that total coming from car repairs, according to a new report from the Transportation Organization or “TRIP” and the North Carolina Chamber Foundation.

The report said nearly 11 percent of major roads and highways in the state are in poor condition with nearly a third of bridges in the state being structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.

In the Raleigh-Durham area, 26 percent of major roads are in either poor or mediocre condition, according to the report. Those road conditions are costing drivers an additional $286 a year. Drivers experience 23 hours of delays on the roads a year in the Triangle, according to the report. That equals $502 in lost time and fuel.

The report also says if Congress doesn't act this summer, federal funding for roads will drop dramatically.

“We are glad the Chamber has helped focus public attention on this critical issue," said Nick Tennyson, the chief deputy secretary for the North Carolina DOT>

"The report confirms what we’ve known for some time. We are dealing with an infrastructure system that requires constant maintenance.  Across the nation and in our state, we see declining transportation revenue projections. At the same time we are focused on leveraging infrastructure to strengthen the economy and create jobs

"We created the Strategic Transportation Investment law to address part of this concern, using a data-driven formula to meet the greatest transportation needs, and more efficiently use existing funds."

Tennyson said the next step is to "address the revenue gap."

"We are looking at alternative ways to provide additional project funding and cost savings, through things like private-public partnerships, the use of GARVEE bonds, the design-build finance construction process, managed lanes and other revenue sources,” he said.

Justin Quesinberry

Justin is a reporter for WNCN and a North Carolina native. He has spent the better part of the last decade covering the news in central North Carolina.  More>>

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