Unwanted guest living in Zephryhills home woman purchased for di - WNCN: News, Weather

Unwanted guest living in Zephryhills home woman purchased for disabled son

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ZEPHYRHILLS, FL (WFLA) -

Jean Popovich purchased a home for her adult son after a devastating motorcycle accident prevented him from working.

"I thought, well rather than wait till I die, he needs it now, I'll just go and buy him a very inexpensive home and he'll have a place to live," said Popovich.

Her son, Bruce Tilton, lived in the home for five years until his recent death.

The deed for the property lists the names of Jean Popovich and Bruce Tilton. According to county records, there is no other deed and no other owner listed.

However, when Popovich went to her son's home after his death, she found another man living in the house.

Related: New Port Richey soldier surprised with renovated home taken over by squatters

"I said, something tragic has happened, my son has died very suddenly and I said you need to move out as quick as you can because I said I can't pay these bills," said Popovich.

The man in the house refused to leave.

"He said, I'm not moving, this is my house and I'm staying here," said Popovich.

WFLA TV contacted the man living in the home. Initially he claimed to have a deed in his name.

When confronted with information from county records he responded that he has documents to prove his claim, but will only show them in court.

Popovich wants the man to leave, but may now have to file a lawsuit to have him ejected from the property.

Attorney John McMillian says it's a common problem.

"If you let somebody in and that person won't move, the only way to get them out is to file a lawsuit, get a judge to enter an order requiring the sheriff to remove them," said McMillian.

State Legislator Amanda Murphy says the law needs to be changed.

"The homeowners should be protected first. This is a property that you pay money on and too often they're not paying the homeowner anything. I've heard of a situation where they are stealing water and electric," said Murphy.

Murphy says she is making it a legislative priority to change the laws of eviction to better protect the homeowner.

Copyright 2014 WFLA. All rights reserved.

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